The Evanston Community Kitchen

A food memoir about women in the kitchen and history in the making. Food = Story.


Inheritance of Story

Just wanted to update you. I am still writing. Still researching, although I have called myself out and realize I could research this book for a lifetime. I am in the process of an office makeover. Juney and Granny Dell would approve — it is designed to be clutter free. I have organized (or rather am organizing) the research I have gathered.  I am also working on another project simultaneously, but these two projects are my focus.

You know (or now you do) that I have my grandmother’s notebooks.  My mother left me my grandma’s notebooks and photo albums. She knew I would need them and had the foresight that mothers do to know I would write this story someday. I do regret not listening to her more acutely when she told me about the Community Kitchen, but the stories are in my bones and I have the letters she wrote Juney to interpret their relationship.

In this notebook are recipes, notations, conversions, and the magic of history.

In this notebook are recipes, notations, conversions, and the magic of history.

I wished I had asked so many more questions, but that is how it turned out.  I was busy with life. Truth be told, my mother and I had a difficult relationship. We were very much alike. But oh, could she make me laugh. I miss her so much. The pain of losing your mother is so acute. I do feel I am moving into the obtuse angle of grief where I can see things more clearly. I like this much better than acute grief, but you can’t have one without the other. Right?

This is a photo with my mom and me. I think sometime in my early twenties, about 24 or 25 years old.

This is a photo with my mom and me. I think sometime in my early twenties, about 24 or 25 years old.

My mother also felt her mother’s death with acuteness. She would have moments when I was older (my grandma died when I was 10) that showed this acute grief retracting from the obtuse angle decades allow. I am curious about how my grandma felt about her mom.  They too had a difficult relationship, so I have heard.  I think they were a lot alike as well, both driven by a furious need to achieve. I have that in me to. Perhaps it is a hole I am trying to fill, perhaps it straight up ambition.

Just wanted to write a quick note and update you. I do appreciate you following this blog. I just want you to know I am hard at work on the manuscript. It’s filled with delectable goodies and interesting historic conflict, as well as personal conflict.

Back to the other project I am working on — I am starting my own company and gearing up to self-publish The Original Journal. I have had to move through many phases of fear and insecurity, but what has prevailed is a business instinct I never knew existed in me. I thank my Elizabeths (Granny Dell, Juney, and Betty) — my great-grandmother, grandma, and mom. I am a fourth generation Elizabeth. My middle name is Elizabeth. My mom’s cousin, shares the same middle name. Mary Liz has been a wonderful resource for this book. She is ninety and sharp as a tack. I call her when I want to hear my mom’s voice. They do not have the same voice, but somehow hearing her distinct voice connects me to my mom. Mary Liz and my mom were very close and kept in contact all my mom’s life. Mary Liz has been wonderful answering my questions and she too possesses the same brevity my mom did. What is important is the connection to the story. This is my story to tell and I am going to tell it.

I wonder what insecurities and fears Granny Dell had when she was starting her business in a time when women were not even active outside the home. Joining a women’s club was looked down upon. Thank goodness she was in a great community of progressive women during the Progressive Era. Evanston 1919 was the right place at the right time to start a business.

I am on the hot pursuit of tracking down the film footage done by Pathe News Media of the Community Kitchen in 1920. I thought I had it nailed when I had a lead that Pathe News Media donated their three thousand miles of film footage to the Museum of Modern Art in 1940, but it was de-accesed in 1950. Now onto the next lead. I know that footage exists somewhere. I can’t wait to watch Juney and Granny Dell prepare a luncheon for 3,000 delegates at a national conference. This is also where my grandma developed an allergy to chicken because it was the hottest day on record for the year and they prepared 5,000 gallons of chicken salad! She avoided chicken her whole life after that. But I am also careful and aware of the rabbit hole of research I can fall into.  I will post pictures here of the office when it is finished.

Did you know that the Community Kitchen renovated a house on Chicago Avenue and used that as its headquarters after it moved from the Evanston Woman’s Club basement. I wonder who picked the colors. I had a time of it deciding on a color for my new office. I went with the color suggestion the interior designer who lives across the street in my historic neighborhood (I live in 1880 Victorian we have fixed up and it has been a project!). This interior designer’s name is Charles and he was born the same year as my mother, 1935. I love talking to him about yesteryear.

More to come and I promise more updates.

Updating once a week is a reasonable promise. So hold me to it!  Granny Dell, Juney, and Betty — you too. 🙂

Grandma and me

Grandma (Juney), Mom (Betty) and me (Megan Elizabeth)

 


Juney, Mom, and Me (and Shaggy — the Pekingese)

This is a photo of Juney, my grandma holding me. My mom, BA as in Betty Anne is sitting next to her.  Our Pekingese, Shaggy is on my mom’s lap. Shaggy bit me under my nose when I was a young child.  He had a sensitive spot and if touched, he would bite. Otherwise, he was about as Zen as they come. My sister and I would put him on top of our collie (like cowboy in saddle) to provoke him into movement. Shaggy was like a monk — quiet and spiritual.  He was a kind dog.

I wish I could go back in time and ask my grandma all the questions I have for her now.

What was it like to go to Cuba in the 1930s?

Tell me about Speakeasies?  Did you go without telling Granny Dell?

I can hear her answer that one … “Of course, I didn’t tell Mother! I wouldn’t dream of it. Harriet and I used to sneak out. We were very clever like that  Mother was a a member of the WCTM (Women’s Christian Temperance Union).”

I have my little notepad and write her messages to keep a diary and include it ALL. Grandma was a humble woman and very private. She was equally fascinating and is certainly the main character of this memoir.

Grandma and me

Grandma and me

Juney’s story of her past as a gourmet executive chef and business woman didn’t matter at this moment in the photo. What mattered most to her was she was a grandma — she was Grandma. That was the role she loved the most.

The German Shepard there is Penny. Mom got rid of her because she bit us.  There was no reason to it.  Shaggy got the pass because of the Pekingese temperament.  Every Pekingese has a sensitive spot. Mom got rid of Penny when she snapped at us when we were kids. I wish I could call Mom up right now and muse a bit about Penny and get the exact reason.  My mind wanders and wants to know, “Did Penny bite us?  Or did she just snap at us?”

Funny, what we can get stuck on.  I have a deep desire to know every exact truth about my grandma, mom, and great-grandmother, but I can’t really. We are private creatures as humans and most people (besides journalers and writers, don’t share those private moments and thoughts in our heads).

But I am on a quest to find the truth of my Elizabeths — Elizabeth Odell (great-grandmother — Granny “Dell”), Elizabeth Odell Welch (grandma —  “Juney”), Elizabeth Welch Miller (Mom — “BA,” “Betty Anne,”  “Betty”) and me (Megan Elizabeth Miller Oteri, memomuse).

1926: Juney goes to the Big Apple to Work for Alice Foote MacDougall — Takes a Big Bite

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My grandmother left Evanston, Illinois in 1926 for the Big Apple.  She left her job as the assistant manager of the Community Kitchen to go to New York City.  Juney (my grandmother) was single. Why not? She was an independent woman and had secured a great job working as Alice Foote MacDougall‘s manager.

I am sure Granny Dell was not very happy about her youngest daughter going to New York by herself. But Juney did.

Granny Dell must have appreciated it a little. I wish I could ask her. “Granny Dell, how did you feel when Juney left Evanston for the Big Apple?”

For more historic images of New York City, see this article in The Atlantic.

Perhaps Granny Dell would answer something like this, “Well, I went to Spokane in 1880 all by myself from Ohio. I didn’t know anyone in Spokane and I had secured a great job as a teacher, so I understood. Deep down I understood. Freedom is a beautiful thing.”

My grandmother wrote down quotes on little scraps of paper and cut out newspaper cartoons and clippings that were inspiring. I have some of them.

One of my favorites that Juney wrote down is: “Wear your learning like your watch, in a private pocket; and do not pull it out, and strike it, merely to show that you have one.” –
Lord Chesterfield

This certainly was true for Juney. She never bragged about her experiences or career. I sure wish she would have when I was a child. But she sure did brag about her grandchildren and her daughter.  Mary Liz, Juney’s niece did not even know that Juney had been to Europe twice. My mom told me last year about her two trips to Europe. Juney went to Cuba in the 30’s too.

My grandmother, Elizabeth Odell Welch -- "Juney"

My grandmother, Elizabeth Odell Welch — “Juney”

Juney was so elegant.  I can’t begin to tell you how beautiful she was.  Well, actually I can and I will — in the book, which I have to get back to writing.


Archival Research: Jaunts and Voyages — A Ticket to a Mansion, the Titanic and Charlotte Russe

Here I am holding The Community Kitchen archive files in the research room in the basement of the Evanston History Center.

20130724_153231

It was a delicious treat to sort through the files related to The Community Kitchen while I was at The Evanston History Center in July. I touched the same scrapbook my great-grandmother assembled, which showcased the numerous articles written by magazines and newspapers. It was so delicate, frayed bits of newspaper crumbling in my hands — little bits of weathered, yellow-with-time paper created a flurry of history snowflakes. It was a very delicate process indeed. I exaggerate. It was not that bad, but the original newspaper articles from almost 100 years ago were quite delicate. The scrapbook that my great-grandmother pasted in the articles cost $.10.  As I looked through the scrapbook, I thought of my great-grandmother pasting them in, with a proud gallant heart. I could only imagine she giggled with delight (although I doubt my great-grandmother giggled).

I took a research class in graduate school (East Carolina University). I admit, at the time of the class, archival research seemed dry and a bit boring. I now think research and archives are the most fascinating thing. I love putting on the white gloves (you must wear white gloves when touching archive photos) and taking jaunts through back in time.

jaunt: (n.) a short excursion or journey for pleasure.

I do not believe my research to be jaunts; they start that way. Then they turn into voyages, traveling across continents, decades and even centuries. History is a wonderful thing.

I just wish I lived closer to Evanston as I have only uncovered the tip of the iceberg. If I lived closer to Evanston, I would be in the research room every chance I could. The Evanston History Center is quite beautiful.

This house is even more exquisite inside.
The Evanston History Center. This house is even more exquisite inside.

And I promise to post more photos soon. But if you would wish to get your how-the-aristocrats-in-America-lived fix, see this post on my Community Kitchen Tumblr site. I do post more time period photos and tidbits regularly there. So, if you look at this photo and are not local to Evanston or the area, go to the left, dare not to step on the manicured lawn, and walk down (skip if you delight as I often felt like skipping while I was there) the sidewalk on the left and you will see a staircase. This staircase will lead you down into the research room, which is in the basement. OK. I can see you would like a photo.

This is the entrance to the research room at the Evanston History Center.
This is the entrance to the research room at the Evanston History Center.

Speaking of icebergs, who is watching Downton Abbey. Oh my! I am so excited about that show. I watched part of an episode with my brother-in-law (he is a history enthusiast), in the middle of season three and thought, “Oh how dreary and dry.”  Then I gave it a second chance and watched it from the beginning. Well, I am on Season 3 and have been longing to watch it every waking minute (when I am not working on the Community Kitchen project or spending time with my family). Even so, how delightful a series.  And I admit, I long to watch it even when I am working on the CK project and spending time with my family. I am completely addicted. Soon, I will be caught up to the end of Season 3, and will wait like a proper lady for the start of Season 4 in January 2014.

Guess who made Charlotte Russe?  Well, of course you know Ethel made it for the girls at the luncheon at Isobel Crawley’s home (I will not put in the spoiler and tell you why she had the luncheon for the Crawley ladies made it).

Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham I love her!
Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham
I love her! Photo Source: Pinterest — Downton Abbey Cooks

But Charlotte Russe was also on the menu as a dessert at The Community Kitchen.

Well, Lady Megan needs to go write and research. research and write.

If you are new to this blog, read this (historic background of Community Kitchen) and this (my connection to the Community Kitchen) to familiarize yourself with the origins of the this historic food memoir project.

What are some of your favorite dishes on Downton Abbey or historic time period recipes?

Food = Story.


Archival Research: Jaunts and Voyages — A Ticket to a Mansion, the Titanic and Charlotte Russe

Here I am holding The Community Kitchen archive files in the research room in the basement of the Evanston History Center.

20130724_153231

It was a delicious treat to sort through the files related to The Community Kitchen while I was at The Evanston History Center in July. I touched the same scrapbook my great-grandmother assembled, which showcased the numerous articles written by magazines and newspapers. It was so delicate, frayed bits of newspaper crumbling in my hands — little bits of weathered, yellow-with-time paper created a flurry of history snowflakes. It was a very delicate process indeed. I exaggerate. It was not that bad, but the original newspaper articles from almost 100 years ago were quite delicate. The scrapbook that my great-grandmother pasted in the articles cost $.10.  As I looked through the scrapbook, I thought of my great-grandmother pasting them in, with a proud gallant heart. I could only imagine she giggled with delight (although I doubt my great-grandmother giggled).

I took a research class in graduate school (East Carolina University). I admit, at the time of the class, archival research seemed dry and a bit boring. I now think research and archives are the most fascinating thing. I love putting on the white gloves (you must wear white gloves when touching archive photos) and taking jaunts through back in time.

jaunt: (n.) a short excursion or journey for pleasure.

I do not believe my research to be jaunts; they start that way. Then they turn into voyages, traveling across continents, decades and even centuries. History is a wonderful thing.

I just wish I lived closer to Evanston as I have only uncovered the tip of the iceberg. If I lived closer to Evanston, I would be in the research room every chance I could. The Evanston History Center is quite beautiful.

This house is even more exquisite inside.

The Evanston History Center. This house is even more exquisite inside.

And I promise to post more photos soon. But if you would wish to get your how-the-aristocrats-in-America-lived fix, see this post on my Community Kitchen Tumblr site. I do post more time period photos and tidbits regularly there. So, if you look at this photo and are not local to Evanston or the area, go to the left, dare not to step on the manicured lawn, and walk down (skip if you delight as I often felt like skipping while I was there) the sidewalk on the left and you will see a staircase. This staircase will lead you down into the research room, which is in the basement. OK. I can see you would like a photo.

This is the entrance to the research room at the Evanston History Center.

This is the entrance to the research room at the Evanston History Center.

Speaking of icebergs, who is watching Downton Abbey. Oh my! I am so excited about that show. I watched part of an episode with my brother-in-law (he is a history enthusiast), in the middle of season three and thought, “Oh how dreary and dry.”  Then I gave it a second chance and watched it from the beginning. Well, I am on Season 3 and have been longing to watch it every waking minute (when I am not working on the Community Kitchen project or spending time with my family). Even so, how delightful a series.  And I admit, I long to watch it even when I am working on the CK project and spending time with my family. I am completely addicted. Soon, I will be caught up to the end of Season 3, and will wait like a proper lady for the start of Season 4 in January 2014.

Guess who made Charlotte Russe?  Well, of course you know Ethel made it for the girls at the tea party (I will not put in the spoiler and tell you why she made it).

Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham I love her!

Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham
I love her!

But Charlotte Russe was also on the menu as a dessert at The Community Kitchen.

Well, Lady Megan needs to go write and research. research and write.

What are some of your favorite dishes on Downton Abbey or historic time period recipes?  Food = Story.


Mozart Cafe is Now Current Location of The Community Kitchen

I am very excited to have coffee at 600 Davis Street this morning. The Mozart Cafe is located there now. I will be having coffee with both granddaughters of Elizabeth Odell. Ginny and Mary Liz are the daughters of Harriet Odell Price, whom wrote the Odell family history I mention in “About the Author” page on this website (see “About the Author” tab at the top of the page on this website for more info.
“Aunt Harriet” as we referred to her was my grandma’s sister. I was nine years old when Aunt Harriet passed away. My memories of her are deep within my mind, made up of regular trips to the North Shore area and Evanston, as I grew up in the Chicago suburb of Wheaton.

I remember vividly sitting with Aunt Harriet eating ginger snaps.

Watching my grandma and Aunt Harriet as a child I had no idea, of course, of their connection to the Community Kitchen. If so, I certainly would have my notebook out and say, “Let’s start at the beginning ladies.”

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Photo by Megan Oteri: July 23, 2013 at The Charles Dawes House — The Evanston History Center

I am thankful to Aunt Harriet for writing and researching the Odell family.  Her words and spirit spill over with great light and inspiration as I embark on the great task of writing the story of The Evanston Community Kitchen, a historic slice of Evanston and American Women’s History.

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Photo by Megan Oteri: Evanston History Center Sign

I leave you with photos I took yesterday with my phone. When I return to North Carolina next week, I will post more photos I took with my digital camera. I am mostly writing posts here from my phone.

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That’s me.

Right across the street from the Evanston History Center is beautiful Lake Michigan.

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Park bench at Charles Dawes Park, across from Evanston History Center

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Four Generations of Elizabeth

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/evanstoncommunitykitchen This is the link to my Tumblr blog for The Community Kitchen. Posts are period photos and things I have been researching. It’s a light and easy reading or viewing, as most posts are photos and images.

I have been working on some blog posts for this wordpress website.  They always end up turning into deep research, which is why this project is so much fun and so much work. I have gathered so much research in nine months.  It is very exciting.  I have been away for awhile as my mother passed away Christmas Eve, 2012. I remember her telling me about The Community Kitchen when I was younger. I wish I had paid attention more, as I long to ask my mother so many questions about my grandmother and great-grandmother.

This is a photo of my mother. Isn’t she beautiful? We all have Elizabeth in common. My great-grandmother’s, grandmother’s, and mother’s name was Elizabeth. My middle name is Elizabeth. This thread of history is fueling my passion for writing the Community Kitchen book and spanning four generations of Elizabeths!

My mom Elizabeth Welch Miller -- daughter if Elizabeth Odell Welch and granddaughter of Elizabeth Hawley Odell

My mom Elizabeth Welch Miller — daughter of Elizabeth Odell Welch and granddaughter of Elizabeth Hawley Odell

“The generations of living things pass in a short time, and like runners hand on the torch of life.” – Lucretius

I have been posting research treats via my Tumblr blog.  If you are interested in the time period of 1918-1951, in particular the 1920’s, you would enjoy the Tumblr blog.

Post coming soon on the wordpress blog: Questions I Would Ask My Grandma Now. I will be posting this in the next couple days, most likely over the weekend.

You can also follow The Community Kitchen on Twitter at www.twitter.com/600DavisSt (@600DavisSt). You can also follow The Community Kitchen on Facebook at www.facebook.com/600DavisSt.

Domestic Revolution: Preserving the Family Meal

Women’s co-op: The Community Kitchen (Link to article in Evanston Now newspaper about a history talk on the Evanston Community Kitchen. See link for details).

Click on link for details of event: http://evanstonnow.com/event/education/bill-smith/2013-03-04/55018/womens-co-op-the-community-kitchen

The Community Kitchen Photo Credit: Evanston Woman's Club

“This Thursday (April 4, 2013) is “Preserving the Family Table,” a presentation covering the fascinating but mostly unknown story of the Community Kitchen.” — Evanston History Center Facebook page

“Women’s history month is year-round at EHC! Join them tonight at 7 pm to learn about the Evanston Community Kitchen, a woman-run cooperative housekeeping venture that sought to revolutionize women’s lives. Presented by Erin Hvizdak.” — Evanston History Center Facebook Page

A wine and appetizer reception catered by Whole Foods Market, Evanston South takes place at 6:30 p.m.

Admission is $10 to the event at the Evanston History Center, located at 225 Greenwood St., Evanston, Illinois 60201, inside the beautiful Dawes House. Event is free for EHC members.

Photo Credit: Jenny Thompson of the Evanston History Center. The event on The Community Kitchen is tonight (April 4) at 7 pm at the Evanston History Center (Dawes House).

The Evanston History Center (Dawes House) ~ Photo Credit: Jenny Thompson of the Evanston History Center. The event on The Community Kitchen is tonight (April 4) at 7 pm at the this beautiful house. Step back in time and attend this wonderful event.

“April Under the Buffalo

A reception catered by Whole Foods Market, Evanston South, kicks off each event at 6:30pm.
Presentations begin at 7pm.
Admission: $10 per event (Payable at the door) EHC Members Free.
Reservations Recommended: jthompson@evanstonhistorycenter.org

“Preserving the Family Table: The Founding of Evanston’s Community Kitchen After WWI”
Presentation by: Erin Hvizdak
Thursday, April 4, 2013 7pm

Learn about the woman-run cooperative housekeeping venture, the Evanston Community Kitchen, founded as a canning kitchen during WWI. At its peak, the kitchen produced hot dinners in state-of-the-art facilities and delivered up to 500 meals per week. Billed as a service of “convenience” for housewives and young single businesswomen, the Evanston Community Kitchen can also be seen as a response to the anxieties felt from shifting gender roles and class relations after WWI.” — Evanston History Center website (http://evanstonhistorycenter.org/events-programs)


It Takes a Village … to Raise (and Maintain) a Building

It Takes a Village … to Raise (and Maintain) a Building.

via It Takes a Village … to Raise (and Maintain) a Building. Click on the link to read about the history of the Woman’s Club of Evanston.

“In 2013, the Woman’s Club of Evanston will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the building of their clubhouse, so prominently featured at 1702 Chicago Avenue in Evanston.” — From the Evanston History Center Blog.

The Community Kitchen started in the basement of the Evanston Woman’s Club (now called the Woman’s Club of Evanston) in 1918.

Women in the kitchen and history in the making. Food = Story.


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Research Treat and Tea: Schrafft’s

My grandmother, Elizabeth Odell Welch (Elizabeth Hawley Odell’s youngest daughter) was the assistant manager for The Community Kitchen.  “Juney,” nicknamed by family, was also the manager for Alice Foote MacDougall in New York.  At the age of 28, she left Evanston and headed for the Big Apple to pursue her own career in the food industry.

Downtown New York from the Woolworth Building
New York: March 2, 1926
Photo Source: http://www.georgeglazer.com

Mrs. Welch’s connection with the business began when it was a wartime project using the facility of the Evanston Woman’s club. She became assistant manager when her mother became the owner of the Community Kitchen, and she continued with it until shortly after it moved to Davis Street.  In 1926 she joined the staff of Alice Foote MacDougall in the tea shop business in New York.  Later she did experimental recipe work for Schrafft’s and before she returned to Evanston in 1947, she was on the staff of General Foods preparing foods for advertising photography.

Source: The Evanston Review Newspaper (May 31, 1951)

My grandmother’s notebook

Inside the notebook pictured above, are index cards with recipes, notations, food conversions, and my grandmother’s beautiful cursive handwriting.  I also found a list of fish entrees.  She must have created the list during her work at Schrafft’s.  How do I know this you say? Well, at first it was a mystery to me as well.

I looked on the back of the paper, wrinkled from time and tinted with age.

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“Fish items Schraffts” was written in cursive.  “Fish,” underlined and written in thick black colored pencil, was my first clue.  A long double dash, then “– items Schraffts” was written in pencil below the black colored pencil.

Photo Source: Shalat Architects

I obtained the 1951 Evanston Review article from my mother’s cousin, Mary Liz Hunt.  I solved the mystery when I read the article. I soon discovered what Schrafft’s was after reading articles about it in The New York Times.

The more research I do, the more I unearth.  This giant puzzle of American women’s history is slowly being put together, recipe by recipe.  I fear writing a blog post that is not up to the standards of Elizabeth Hawley Odell and Elizabeth Odell Welch — two women who were extraordinary women in their time, as well as chefs and business women before their time.  I do believe it would be safe to say they were perfectionists as well.

Some of the examples of fish entrees from my grandmother’s notebook, with Schrafft’s written on the back, including the price from the typed list include:

  • Soft Shell Crabs on Toast a la Schrafft                            Varies
  • Creamed Halibut on Toast (Fresh Halibut)                     .60
  • Grilled Sardines on Toast w. Parsley Butter Sauce        .65
  • Seafood a la Newburg with French Fried Potatoes        .85
  • Fresh Lobster Fricassee w. Biscuits                                  Varies

I imagine my grandmother, in New York, preparing these items in the executive kitchen at Schrafft’s headquarters or perhaps at one of their restaurants.  She is dressed in a white chef coat, her hair perfectly styled, as it always was — not a hair out of place.  Her classic white streak in her hair, which I inherited, showing on the left side of her beautiful thick hair. Her pearls are around her neck; in stockings and heels, dressed glamorously.

Schrafft’s Dining Room — Photo Source: Shalat Architects

Juney’s last words to me were, “Comb your hair, Megan.”  She had a stroke prior to this, and we visited her at the Mather Home in Evanston before she passed away. I was only ten years old when she died.  Her spirit has been with me since I was born.  Juney was strong and elegant.  She was confident in a way I wanted to be, even as a young child.  Her presence was calming and reassuring.  I can only imagine how graceful she was in a kitchen and how elegant she must have been walking on the busy streets of Manhattan in the late 20’s, 30’s and 40’s.

Experimental recipes sounds fitting, as she was a trailblazer and was never afraid of the unknown.

As I begin the journey of writing this powerful piece of American women’s history, I am channeling her spirit.  I realize I too, am preparing an experimental recipe.

This is an article about Schrafft’s from The New York Times.  

In the kitchen: I am working on a post about contacting the great-grandson of Frank Shatuff — the man who started Schrafft’s.